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23

Oct

Top Ten 2012: Across the Universe by Beth Revis

Every year YALSA hosts a vote for the Top Ten Teen Books of the Year. Only teens can vote, choosing the books they loved. Here’s number five:

Across the Universe by Beth Revis

Cryogenically frozen centuries ago, Amy and her parents are on their way to a new planet aboard the spaceship, Godspeed. Unplugged from her cryo chamber, Amy discovers she has been awoken 50 years early, in a failed murder attempt. With Elder, the future leader of the ship, by her side they are on an adventure filled with murder, lies, dreams, and stars.

From my review:

I enjoyed the dual telling of this story, switching from Amy to Elder. Revis did a good job making their voices distinct, particularly in inventing different speech patterns for Elder and the other inhabitants of the ship. Amy talks like people do today—she is just like a modern teenager. Elder however uses new terminology and slang that build the world of the ship and set him apart from Amy.

03

May

What Makes a Good YA Dystopian Novel?

Dystopias are characterized as a society that is a counter-utopia, a repressed, controlled, restricted system with multiple social controls put into place via government, military, or a powerful authority figure. Issues of surveillance and invasive technologies are often key, as is a consistent emphasis that this is not a place where you’d want to live.

In the same way that talking about fantasy books without mentioning a certain boy wizard would be absurd (see Roger Sutton’s “What Hath Harry Wrought?”), any discussion of YA dystopia must acknowledge the impact of the taut, intricately plotted, and haunting Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins. While YA dystopias existed before it (and many of these were spawned by Lois Lowry’s The Giver, for younger readers), there is no discounting the bump in numbers and popularity since The Hunger Games was published, and the movie has only served to draw more attention. Thus, it’s helpful to know what makes for a good YA dystopian novel, and to have some titles in mind when you get the inevitable groan from teens after they finish Mockingjay and want more to read.

A note on definition: while shambling, brain-eating zombies; nuclear holocausts; electromagnetic space pulses that knock out most of the population; or alien invasions all make for compelling reading, they do not necessarily fall into the category of dystopia. Now, if the survivors of those various tragedies form a messed-up society where freedoms are curtailed in order to protect its citizens from imagined future terrible events, then we’re talking dystopia.

There are four major elements that appear consistently in good YA dystopian novels. Certainly a book need not have all of them, but the best do: a setting so vividly and clearly described that it becomes almost a character in itself; individuals or forces in charge who have a legitimate reason for being as they are; protagonists who are shaped by their environment and situations; and a conclusion that reflects the almost always dire circumstances.

In Across the Universe by Beth Revis, the setting is an interstellar spaceship, Godspeed, which is at once wondrous and claustrophobic to Amy, who was awoken from a cryogenic chamber and must now navigate the physical and social anomalies of this self-contained world. The descriptions are riveting, and the layers of lies that are built around the ship (and keep the generations who live and die within its walls docile) make the ship itself as integral an element as protagonist Amy.
In Fever Crumb, Philip Reeve uses gripping, slightly mysterious, complex language to describe his setting. The city of London and its scrambling, scrappy residents, the strange and slowly disintegrating giant head in which the Engineers live, and the very earliest rumblings (this novel is set centuries before Reeve’s Mortal Engines quartet) of the mechanics that will allow for the moving cities are stunning. The humor built into the descriptions is an elegant contrast to Fever’s hyper-rational approach to life, and the setting acts as an impressive foil against which she must struggle to remain the same rather than be shaped by the larger, much more wild and unpredictable but simultaneously much richer world.

A clever setting-as-character example is the world of Incarceron by Catherine Fisher. The prison experiment called Incarceron, a now self-aware and tyrannical entity, shapes the dystopia as much as the people who exist there. Fisher’s protagonists are intriguing and well developed, but even they are less memorable than the brilliantly conceived Incarceron that—having escaped the control of its original creators—sees, influences, punishes, and restricts according to its own standards.
A bad guy with no depth, vulnerability, history, or context functions as a foil for the protagonist but adds little else to the story. Depth of character makes the struggle between good and evil (against an individual or society) far more vivid. In the Hunger Games trilogy, Snow is one of many worthy villains; interestingly, he is perhaps the more blatantly malign but also slightly more sympathetic villain (in comparison to Coin) to emerge from the series. It is clear that he is following in a line of leaders who made similar choices, and it is equally clear that he is an exaggerated representation of the society in which he came to power. The lack of a specific “bad guy” but rather an example of a well-intentioned society gone horribly awry is presented in Ally Condie’s Matched, where the earnest and well-meaning Society has evolved into an entity that has whittled down the world into manageable, easily digestible amounts: this society allows exactly one hundred songs (and pictures, poems, etc.) and arranges carefully planned love matches that take any guesswork out of romance. It is all safe and cozy and may not immediately appear dystopian—until the reality of not being able to shape anything in your own life truly sinks in.

In Ashes, Ashes by Jo Treggiari, Lucy is prepared to acknowledge that ninety-nine percent of the population is gone and that her choices are few. What she isn’t ready to accept, and what makes this novel so complex, is that she is apparently the only immune person left on Earth, and she could best help the planet’s survival by giving her blood—all her blood—for medical use. The pace is superb, and the vivid descriptions of the new attempts at society are well crafted, but it is the choices the amoral but brilliant scientists make that push Lucy to define herself as martyr or survivor. The fact that the key scientist still feels like the kindest person Lucy has recently encountered complicates things all the more, as it lays bare how intensely vulnerable and alone she is in this ravaged world.

It is convenient to the story to have a rebel grandparent or elder who remembers how it used to be “before” and can account for how his or her offspring is different than the average citizen, but for the most part good dystopian novels don’t just take contemporary characters from realistic fiction and dump them into dystopic settings. The characters who clearly cannot see beyond the ways in which they have been raised force readers to consider not only how they might respond in that society, but also to thoughtfully assess elements of adolescence that carry across setting (snark, pushing at boundaries, curiosity about and interest in the newest technology, hormonal adjustments). Scott Westerfeld’s Uglies series, set in a dystopian environment where resources are plentiful but the use of them is highly suspect, offers characters shaped by having been raised in this world of enforced conformity. While some resist and others embrace it, Westerfeld’s protagonists are carefully operating within the boundaries of his creepy, image-obsessed world.

Two prime examples from opposite ends of the dystopian civilization spectrum are M. T. Anderson’s Feed and the Chaos Walking trilogy by Patrick Ness. Both address the effects of being permanently tapped into constantly flowing information (in Ness’s world, it is more metaphorical as a virus that causes thoughts to be heard; in Anderson’s capitalist nightmare everything is literally messaged directly into your brain), and both feature protagonists who reflect their environments, even as they catch occasional glimpses of how life could be otherwise. The protagonists are so richly developed, so compelling, and so hopelessly ensnared that they evoke sympathy even as they inevitably exasperate the reader.

Finally, Divergent by Veronica Roth is a movie-ready example of a novel that includes tantalizing snippets of a dystopic society that has led to citizens deriving their identity from belonging to one of five personality-based factions. While much of the focus is actually on Beatrice’s response to not slotting perfectly into one of those factions and her training once she chooses, there is no doubt that she will indeed select from the limited options she is presented, unable to envision what a different path would resemble.

In terms of how a novel wraps up, hopeful is good, and measured optimism works beautifully, but often you just can’t escape unscathed. In some cases, authors are daring enough (or heartless enough, depending on your tolerance for sad endings) to let their protagonists face seemingly insurmountable obstacles and find that they are, indeed, just that. The shocking conclusion of Ashes by Ilsa J. Bick is one of the coolest new examples of this: while the novel is closer to post-apocalyptic than pure dystopia, there is certainly a dystopic community in which Alex finds herself—a settlement that doesn’t try to exist as the world had been before but is shaped by an entirely new set of morals and standards. This paradigm shift, should the members survive their own chilling ethical choices, will surely result in a quintessential dystopic world.

The Eleventh Plague by Jeff Hirsch is also set as an end-of-the-world survival novel, but the strictly controlled elements of the community that has rebuilt itself to resemble how life used to be (complete with creepy baseball games that feel so…eerily incorrect in their very normalcy) seem like an obvious example of dystopia masking as utopia. Life there is better than what exists outside of Settler’s Landing, but the protagonist is forced to conclude that there is no such thing as a true haven anymore.

Cory Doctorow’s Little Brother probably represents the purest example on the list—modern technology meets classic dystopic elements—even while the book itself is part instructional guide, part love story, and part rant at the increasingly dictatorial powers that be that consider safety at any cost a reasonable exchange. Small personal victories for the protagonist and his friends are present, but the power of Big Brother is hardly tempered by their work, and the folks who tangled with the government are all permanently scarred by the encounter.

A bonus element from the above titles is the lingering point of consideration with which readers are left—wondering how and where they would fit (disturbing the universe, representing one of the masses, or somewhere in between), and perhaps also contemplating how near or far their own social structure is from what they just read. All the titles above lend themselves to such musings, and the protagonists within are also likely to give some thought to these issues—it is often how they move from quiet discontent to activism. Of course, these questions are moot when you aren’t sure if you are going to survive at all, and there are several dystopian novels that feature characters who (though the reader knows better) would scoff at the notion of philosophical debate, given that they are literally running, fighting, or competing to stay alive. Well-written dystopias, the most memorable ones, offer both: space for asking big-scale life questions along with plenty of adventure and danger to keep things exciting as one cogitates.

Good YA Dystopias
Feed (Candlewick, 2002) by M. T. Anderson
Ashes (Egmont, 2011) by Ilsa J. Bick
Hunger Games trilogy: The Hunger Games (Scholastic, 2008), Catching Fire (2009), Mockingjay (2010) by Suzanne Collins
Matched (Dutton, 2010) by Ally Condie (sequel Crossed, 2011)
Little Brother (Tor, 2008) by Cory Doctorow
Incarceron (Dial, 2010) by Catherine Fisher (sequel Sapphique, 2010)
The Eleventh Plague (Scholastic, 2011) by Jeff Hirsch
Chaos Walking trilogy: The Knife of Never Letting Go (Candlewick, 2008), The Ask and the Answer (2009), Monsters of Men (2010) by Patrick Ness
Fever Crumb (Scholastic, 2010) by Philip Reeve (sequel A Web of Air, 2011)
Across the Universe (Razorbill/Penguin, 2011) by Beth Revis (sequel A Million Suns, 2012)
Divergent (Tegen/HarperCollins, 2011) by Veronica Roth (sequel Insurgent, May 2012)
Ashes, Ashes (Scholastic, 2011) by Jo Treggiari
The Uglies series: Uglies (Simon Pulse, 2005), Pretties (2005), Specials (2006), Extras (2007) by Scott Westerfeld

13

Apr

Nominees for YALSA’s Top Ten Books of the Year

All Good Children by Catherine Austen (Orca Book Publishing, 2011; 9781554698240)
Max, his sister Ally, and their mother return home to Middleton to find Ally’s classmates acting strange. It is the future, and the government has created a “vaccine” to make kids easier to teach–they are less rowdy, less likely to question, and willing to obey any direction. Max’s family has a choice: to be “vaccinated,” to flee their home, or stay and fight.



Ashes by Ilsa Bick (Egmont USA, 2011; 9781606841754)
Alex, Tom, and Ellie join forces after an electromagnetic pulse sweeps through the sky. The pulse kills most of the world’s population and destroys all computer devices, but it also turns some who remain into zombies or gives them superhuman senses.


Abandon by Meg Cabot (Point, 2012; 9780545040648)
Pierce has experienced death before and barely escaped. When she moves from her old town to a town called Isla Huesos–Island of Bones–for a new start, she realizes that death wants her back. Can she escape death once again?


Tempest by Julie Cross (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2012; 9780312568894)
Jackson is a typical college kid until the day his girlfriend, Holly, is shot. Jackson decides he must use his one incredible gift, the ability to time travel. He goes back in time two years, trying to discover a way to alter the future so that Holly lives. The future is full of uncertainty and the past is full of betrayal–is there anyone Jackson can trust?

What Happened to Goodbye by Sarah Dessen (Penguin Group/Viking Juvenile, 2011; 9780670012947)
Ever since McLean’s parents divorced, she has lived in four towns in two years–each time taking on a new persona. McLean expects to leave Lakeview in six months, but soon finds that she doesn’t want to–she just wants to be herself.

Wither by Lauren DeStefano (Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2011; 9781442409057)
In the future, experimental genetics ensures that males only live to 25 and females to 20. When 16-year-old Rhine is kidnapped and sold into marriage, she is determined not to let her walls down for anyone so she can escape and go home to her brother. But when she meets her sister wives and Gabriel, a handsome servant, she finds it harder than ever as she tries to plan her escape under the watchful eye of her sinister father-in-law.

Where She Went by Gayle Forman (Penguin Group/Dutton Juvenile, 2011; 9780525422945)
This sequel to Gayle Forman’s If I Stay is narrated by Adam, Mia’s ex-boyfriend. Shortly after the devastating accident that killed Mia’s family, the talented cellist moves to New York, where an accidental meeting brings them back together.

Scarlet by A.C. Gaughen (Walker Children’s, 2012; 9780802723468)
Will Scarlett is one of the Merry Men, Robin Hood’s legendary band of thieves, but what few people know is that Will Scarlett is actually … a girl! Disguised as a boy to escape from her past, Scarlett robs from the rich and gives to the poor. When an old enemy of Scarlett’s appears, she must choose: Keep her identity hidden? Or keep the people of Nottingham safe?

Eona: The Last Dragoneye by Alison Goodman (Penguin Group/Viking Juvenile, 2011; 9780670063116)
As the battle for ultimate control of her home draws near, Eona finds herself waging an internal battle that might cause more damage than the war threatening to break out across the kingdom.

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green (Penguin Group/Dutton Juvenile, 2012; 9780525478812)
Hazel and Augustus meet and forge a relationship at a support group for kids battling cancer. As Hazel and Augustus struggle with the “side-effects of dying,” they come to learn the strength of wishes, the complexities of long human lives, and the wondrous ways of the universe.

Page by Paige by Laura Lee Gulledge (Abrams/Amulet Books, 2011; 9780810997219)
When Paige Turner and her family move to Brooklyn from rural Virginia, she tries to make sense of her new life through her sketchbook, which exposes her true personality and helps her find herself.

Legend by Marie Lu (Penguin Group/Putnam Juvenile, 2011; 978-0399256752)
June, a fifteen-year-old military prodigy, is hunting Day, the outlaw she believes is responsible for her brother’s death. What will happen when the two meet and discover the government is corrupt?

Hourglass by Myra McEntire (Egmont USA, 2011; 9781606841440)
Emerson Cole sees dead people–ghosts from the past blending in with her surroundings. When a new consultant from a secretive organization shows up at her door to try to cure her, everything changes. But diving into the world of the mysterious Hourglass Society proves to be dangerous as the past merges with the present.

Cinder by Marissa Meyer (Macmillan/Feiwel and Friends, 2012; 978031261894
A futuristic retelling of the classic Cinderella. Cinder, a cyborg and talented mechanic, lives with her cruel stepmother and two stepsisters in the plague-ridden New Beijing. Soon after meeting Prince Kai, Cinder must find the truths of her past, which may help to save the future.

Shine by Lauren Myracle (Abrams/Amulet Books, 2011; 9780810984172)
When her best friend falls victim to a horrible hate crime, sixteen-year-old Cat sets out to discover the culprits in her backwoods town in North Carolina.

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness, inspired by an idea from Siobhan Dowd, illustrated by Jim Kay (Candlewick, 2011; 9781406311525)
Conor suddenly wakes up just past midnight to find a monster outside his window. This monster wants something from Conor that he is reluctant to give: the truth.

This Dark Endeavor: The Apprenticeship of Victor Frankenstein by Kenneth Oppel (Simon & Shuster Books for Young Readers, 2011; 9781442403154)
In this prequel to Frankenstein, Victor Frankenstein is on a dark quest to save his twin’s life. With help from his best friend Henry and his lovely cousin Elizabeth, the three go on a quest to concoct the mythical Elixir of Life. How far is he willing to go to save his twin?

Across the Universe by Beth Revis (Penguin Group/Razorbill, 2011; 9781595143976)
Cryogenically frozen centuries ago, Amy and her parents are on their way to a new planet aboard the spaceship Godspeed. Unplugged from her cryo chamber, Amy discovers she has been awoken 50 years early, in a failed murder attempt. With Elder, the future leader of the ship, by her side, they are on an adventure filled with murder, lies, dreams, and stars.

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs (Quirk Books, 2011; 9781594744761)
When Jacob was little, his grandfather would tell him stories of the fantastical children’s home where he grew up and the seemingly magical kids who lived there with him. When his grandfather is killed, Jacob sets out to find the home where these children lived, unearthing a magical secret and uncovering his true heritage.

Divergent by Veronica Roth (HarperCollins/Katherine Tegen Books, 2011; 9780062024022)
Abnegation (selflessness), Erudite (intelligence), Candor (honesty), Amity (peace), or Dauntless (bravery): where would you fit? Beatrice lives in a society where she must choose either to remain with her family’s faction or set off towards independence and her beliefs. And what happens when the unity between these factions begins to fall apart?

Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys (Penguin Group/Philomel Books, 2011; 9780399254123)
In 1941, Lina, her mother, and her younger brother are taken from their home in Lithuania and sent to Siberia. The only thing that keeps her going is her secretly-created art and the hope that one day she’ll be be reunited with her father.

The Scorpio Races by Maggie Stiefvater (Scholastic/Scholastic Press, 2011; 9780545224901)
Every November, the beaches of Thisby come alive with the Scorpio Races. The water horses are vicious, the terrain is treacherous, and death is likely, but the reward can be beyond anything you could imagine. Puck Connolly is racing for her family, Sean Kendrick for his passion–but only one can win The Scorpio Races.

How to Save a Life by Sara Zarr (Little, Brown Books For Young Readers, 2011; 9780316036061)
A year after Jill’s father dies, her mother decides to adopt a baby. Mandy’s been living in different places, but now that she’s pregnant, she wants to make sure her baby has the love and support she never did. A story of two girls dealing with grief, new life, and everything in between when their paths cross.

All These Things I’ve Done by Gabrielle Zevin (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2011; 9780374302108)
In 2083, water is rationed, paper is rare, and coffee and chocolate are illegal. Anya Balanchine balances a mobster family, ailing grandmother, and forbidden love–until it all comes crashing down.

11

Apr

25 Series to read if you liked The Hunger Games

10

Apr

Defining Genre: The Problem with “Dystopian Romance”

Very interesting article about how defining books as “dystopia” can be troublesome, and why romance and scifi are still at odds with adult readers.

Defining Genre

What’s more, I also despise the publishing practice of labeling any young adult science fiction work “dystopian.” One of my first articles here at the Academy was one delineating the differences between dystopic and post-apocalyptic literature. I know that my standards for definition of these terms are a bit higher than they are for some readers–a “pear-shaped” society filled with corruption isn’t enough for me. I prefer that the term only be used for fictional worlds that are outwardly utopic (either through scientific or political means) but whose perfection hides a sinister interior. In my eyes, futuristic worlds that simply suck are just part and parcel of the broader category of “science fiction.” I’ve seen many YA works mislabeled in this way–Anna Sheehan’s A Long Long Sleep was one that wholly lacked any dystopian worldbuilding but was still saddled with that label by its publishers.

What’s more, I’m not keen on giving a pass to books with bad worldbuilding. If one complaint about these so-called “dystopian romances” came up over and over again, it was that their worldbuilding was weak or underdeveloped, a facet which these readers took as evidence that the authors simply intended the dystopian society to be a contrivance meant to keep young lovers apart. I’m distracted by poor worldbuilding–that’s why Sean and I decided to include a “viability rating” on all of our reviews. However, I don’t think that a science fiction novel with bad worldbuilding is “not science fiction.” Instead, it’s simply “a sci-fi novel with bad worldbuilding.”

21

Jan

Notes on a book: Across the Universe

Rating: Fun Read

I never quite expected a space opera romance to come out of the YA dystopia realm. It was better than I expected, and quite a good read. As soon as I can get my hands on my ARC of the sequel I will definitely be reading on.

Across the Universe tells the parallel stories of Amy and Elder. Amy and her parents get onboard the spaceship Godspeed in order to travel hundreds of lightyears to a new planet and colonize a new Earth. They are frozen in statsis so that they will sleep the 300 years of the journey and wake up the same age on the other side. Two hundred and fifty years go by…

Elder is being trained to be the next leader of the ship. Years before a Plague ravaged the crew of the ship, forcing the first “Eldest” to form a new society and a new leadership. Now everyone on the ship lives in harmony and peace. But when Elder discovers a secret level to the ship, and a beautiful girl in frozen sleep, everything will begin to change. Because when that girl is woken up, she will bring everything that almost destroyed the ship before.

Read More

Notes on a book: Across the Universe

Rating: Fun Read

I never quite expected a space opera romance to come out of the YA dystopia realm. It was better than I expected, and quite a good read. As soon as I can get my hands on my ARC of the sequel I will definitely be reading on.

Across the Universe tells the parallel stories of Amy and Elder. Amy and her parents get onboard the spaceship Godspeed in order to travel hundreds of lightyears to a new planet and colonize a new Earth. They are frozen in statsis so that they will sleep the 300 years of the journey and wake up the same age on the other side. Two hundred and fifty years go by…

Elder is being trained to be the next leader of the ship. Years before a Plague ravaged the crew of the ship, forcing the first “Eldest” to form a new society and a new leadership. Now everyone on the ship lives in harmony and peace. But when Elder discovers a secret level to the ship, and a beautiful girl in frozen sleep, everything will begin to change. Because when that girl is woken up, she will bring everything that almost destroyed the ship before.

I enjoyed the dual telling of this story, switching from Amy to Elder. Revis did a good job making their voices distinct, particularly in inventing different speech patterns for Elder and the other inhabitants of the ship. Amy talks like people do today—she is just like a modern teenager. Elder however uses new terminology and slang that build the world of the ship and set him apart from Amy.

The mystery of the ship and its secrets was good and well plotted. Revis keeps you guessing from one reveal to the next, and even I couldn’t guess the big final secret that is revealed at the end.

The one criticism I have is that Revis abused her first person to a very small extent. Usually in first person the narrator cannot keep any secrets from the reader, but Revis keeps a huge secret from the reader, and I have a hard time forgiving her for that, because at the end when that secret is revealed your trust in that character feels betrayed. Because if that character kept that secret from you, what else are they hiding? This “trick” ruins the genuineness of her first person narrative just a little. I still enjoyed the book, but it makes me a little cautious about the rest of the series.

Overall a fun read, and definitely worth the time if you like dystopia, or are looking for something a little different.

19

Jan

What I’m reading…
Across the Universe by Beth Revis

Amy is a cryogenically frozen passenger aboard the vast spaceship Godspeed. She expects to awaken on a new planet, 300 years in the future. But fifty years before Godspeed's scheduled landing, Amy's cryo chamber is unplugged, and she is nearly killed.
Now, Amy is caught inside an enclosed world where nothing makes sense. Godspeed's passengers have forfeited all control to Eldest, a tyrannical and frightening leader, and Elder, his rebellious and brilliant teenage heir.
Amy desperately wants to trust Elder. But should she? All she knows is that she must race to unlock Godspeed's hidden secrets before whoever woke her tries to kill again.

What I’m reading…

Across the Universe by Beth Revis

Amy is a cryogenically frozen passenger aboard the vast spaceship Godspeed. She expects to awaken on a new planet, 300 years in the future. But fifty years before Godspeed's scheduled landing, Amy's cryo chamber is unplugged, and she is nearly killed.

Now, Amy is caught inside an enclosed world where nothing makes sense. Godspeed's passengers have forfeited all control to Eldest, a tyrannical and frightening leader, and Elder, his rebellious and brilliant teenage heir.

Amy desperately wants to trust Elder. But should she? All she knows is that she must race to unlock Godspeed's hidden secrets before whoever woke her tries to kill again.

26

Jan

BOOK OF THE DAY: Across the Universe by Beth Revis

A love out of time. A spaceship built of secrets and murder.



Seventeen-year-old Amy joins her parents as frozen cargo aboard the vast spaceship Godspeed and expects to awaken on a new planet, three hundred years in the future. Never could she have known that her frozen slumber would come to an end fifty years too soon and that she would be thrust into the brave new world of a spaceship that lives by its own rules.




Amy quickly realizes that her awakening was no mere computer malfunction. Someone-one of the few thousand inhabitants of the spaceship-tried to kill her. And if Amy doesn’t do something soon, her parents will be next.




Now Amy must race to unlock Godspeed’s hidden secrets. But out of her list of murder suspects, there’s only one who matters: Elder, the future leader of the ship and the love she could never have seen coming.

BOOK OF THE DAY: Across the Universe by Beth Revis

A love out of time. A spaceship built of secrets and murder.

Seventeen-year-old Amy joins her parents as frozen cargo aboard the vast spaceship Godspeed and expects to awaken on a new planet, three hundred years in the future. Never could she have known that her frozen slumber would come to an end fifty years too soon and that she would be thrust into the brave new world of a spaceship that lives by its own rules.

Amy quickly realizes that her awakening was no mere computer malfunction. Someone-one of the few thousand inhabitants of the spaceship-tried to kill her. And if Amy doesn’t do something soon, her parents will be next.

Now Amy must race to unlock Godspeed’s hidden secrets. But out of her list of murder suspects, there’s only one who matters: Elder, the future leader of the ship and the love she could never have seen coming.